Bessie Smith was one of the first blues singers to become a nationwide sensation.

When she died at age 43 in 1937, her death certificate listed causes of death as “a broken jaw and being struck by an automobile.” What many people don’t know is that Bessie Smith’s success story had its ups and downs-her career went through some hard times before it took off. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at how Bessie Smith got her groove back after struggling with debt and personal struggles.

Keywords: bessie smith, blues, american music

In the early 1920s, Bessie Smith was a national star. But in 1923 she suffered an injury to her vocal chords and stopped performing for years while they healed. She tried various ways-including spiritual healing-to cure herself of stage fright but nothing seemed to work until she discovered drinkin’ gin as a way to calm down before taking the stage. The alcohol made her voice hoarse so that when she got back on stage after more than three years off it wasn’t great but it would do – “I sang like I had sandpaper throat.” Her comeback tour failed miserably because most people didn’t know who she was anymore or what kind of performer she’d become with this rough voice which sounded “like a man,” but she poured her heart out to the rowdy crowds that remained.

Bessie Smith had been one of America’s most popular stars in 1923 when an injury to her vocal chords forced her off stage for more than three years while they healed themselves. She tried various ways, including spiritual healing, to cure herself of stage fright without success until she discovered drinkin’ gin as a way to calm down before taking the stage. The alcohol made her voice hoarse so that when she got back on stage after more than three years off it wasn’t great but it would do – “I sang like I had sandpaper throat.” Her comeback tour failed miserably because most people didn’t know who she was anymore.

But she poured her heart out to the rowdy crowds that remained and, even if her voice wasn’t quite what it had been before, they knew. They were glad for a chance to see their old friend again and give her an ovation as loud as anyone in New York City had ever heard one given (especially from black folks). Bessie Smith was back, baby! And this time she never left; by 1941 she’d recorded more than 100 songs and gotten herself inducted into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame – where nobody knows you when you’re down and out.

This post is about how bessie smith got her groove back after stage fright sidelined her career for three years during which time

Her name was Bessie Smith, a singer with the jazz and blues styles of her day. She had it all – fame, fortune, tremendous talent. But like so many stars before and after her, she lost it all too early when she died in 1937 at 44 years old. Her tragic story has been told over and over again by historians who have searched for meaning there or just enjoyed hearing about one more great legend from America’s past losing their battle against drugs and alcohol abuse.

The truth is that we only know what happened to Bessie because right when she was peaking as an artist they started documenting everything she did on film as part of Paramount Records’ “race records” program which captured some of the highest-quality footage of black singers, dancers and musicians in the early 20th century.

Today her life is celebrated through films like “Bessie” where she’s portrayed by Queen Latifah who tells Bessie Smith’s story with an intimate understanding that only a fellow artist could have for someone else on their level. It shares with the audience what it would be like to live as a woman being treated as property; being expected to give up everything you love out of duty to your parents, spouse or children because society told them they had no other choice but to provide for those things themselves. And yet somehow finding the strength every day not just survive but thrive even when all odds were against you

until finally you reach down inside yourself and find that long lost groove and just shake it out.

In the wake of her death, in a time where black artists were being silenced by those who would profit off them, Bessie Smith was there to give voice to all she’d been through for decades while also giving hope to millions who felt like they had no voice at all. She sang about the same struggles as everyone else – love, betrayal, heartache – but she did so with a rawness few could pull off because she understood firsthand what it feels like when you’re not seen or heard. All her songs are truth telling narratives written in melody; each one an act of rebellion against society’s expectations and limitations set on women. And now two decades later we’re still getting the blues.

You can’t step outside your skin to see what’s inside, you’ve got to look in that mirror and know yourself before someone else defines who you are or judges you by your appearance. You’re not always going to be on top of it all the time, but just shake it out like Bessie Smith did when she was down and out for real with no one there at her side. Shake away those blues until they dissipate into nothingness because nobody knows up from down when they’re hard times hit them again and again like waves crashing against a shoreline – which is why we need each other more than ever right now. No matter how many people try telling us otherwise (it only takes one person to make you feel a little less alone).

We’re all trying so hard to find that place where we truly belong, but for many of us it’s easier said than done (or even if it is easy there are always those who might try and take away our dignity with their words or actions

because no matter how much money we have in the bank or what status symbols we wear on our wrists, none of them will ever define who we really are). There may be times when life feels like an uphill battle, especially if you’ve been told your whole life that certain things can’t happen for you. But just ask Bessie Smith: not only did she survive her darkest hour, but she went on to become one of the most influential blues singers in the history of American music. In this post, we’ll explore how she got her groove back and then took it to a whole other level. Won’t you join us? __ Mentions: Bessie Smith, Blues Music, The Great Depression (America), Jazz-Blues Fusion Evolution Key Quote: “Bessie was always singing about life on the streets with love.” – Shirley Horn How did Bessie Smith get her groove back after being down and out ? *She survived through some dark times in America during the great depression.* And when things finally started looking up for her career wise.. she went even further–blending jazz with

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here