I hate it when I lose my Indian friend in the mall, or on the side of the street. Actually, I would be lying if I said that didn’t happen to me all too often.

It’s not a heart-breaking experience as much as an embarrassing one – and yet it still hurts every time.

Many Indian people in this country are uncomfortable with the physical concept of “losing.” It could be because there is a sentimentality attached to it, or maybe even an idea that one’s soul might be pulled out too. Whatever the case may be, I’m sure many Indians can relate when they find themselves feeling lost without their friends by their side at any given moment – especially so for those who grew up abroad and now live back home.

I’ve learned not to take things so personally when my family members tell me what time we’re meeting but then don’t show up on time. Again, this happens all too often – and yes, I still get frustrated every time it does happen! But really, if you think about it, it’s not that hard to cancel plans on the fly if you have a good sense of time. And yes, I’m including myself in this too – because there are many times when my friends will tell me they’re going out at night and then I’ll find them chilling with their other Indian friend doing something else instead.

There’s definitely an etiquette behind cancelling or rescheduling events, but unfortunately we Indians don’t always stick to these customs – which can be confusing for those who don’t understand why people might say one thing and do another.

That said though, some things just happen so last minute that there is no way anyone could’ve known about it beforehand (like accidents). Again, this happens all too often over here.

I also find it really awkward when my friends cancel on me last minute and I end up seeing them out with their other Indian friend without knowing what’s going on, because they could’ve told me but didn’t want to inconvenience me or something like that. It just feels icky for some reason – like “oh no you’re not coming to the party? You have fun! Bye!” And then we never talk again which is sad.

Lastly, there are times when people will get back together after a fight and break up days later (or vice versa) and this can be super confusing if you don’t know who was talking about breaking-up first in the conversation or how serious each person took the argument before everything went down.

It’s just really uncomfortable to lose your Indian friend, because you might not see them again or they may have a different perspective on something that happened in the past and it all just feels weird after awhile. It doesn’t matter how close of friends we are – an awkward break-up is always going to be upsetting for both parties involved which is why I think more people should do their best at being respectful when breaking up with someone even if it was like two weeks ago. You never know what could happen between now and tomorrow morning! Better safe than sorry. 🙂

If you’re new here, hello and welcome! My name is Priya Srivastava and this blog post covers my thoughts on losing friendship among Indians.

To start off, it’s really uncomfortable to lose your Indian friend in the first place because you might not see them again or they may have a different perspective on something that happened in the past and it all just feels weird after awhile. It doesn’t matter how close of friends we are – an awkward break-up is always going to be upsetting for both parties involved which is why I think more people should do their best at being respectful when breaking up with someone even if it was like two weeks ago. You never know what could happen between now and tomorrow morning! Better safe than sorry. 🙂

So, without further ado..here are my ten reasons as to why losing friendships among Indians can cause discomfort:

This is a long-form article about why it’s uncomfortable to lose your Indian friend.

It starts off with the writer giving an introduction, and continuing on by saying they have ten reasons as to why losing friendships among Indians can cause discomfort:

There may be awkwardness in certain situations, you might not see them again or they may have a different perspective on something that happened in the past so everything just feels weird after awhile. It doesn’t matter how close of friends we are – an awkward break-up is always going to be upsetting for both parties involved which is why I think more people should do their best at being respectful when breaking up with someone even if it was like two weeks ago. You never know what could happen between now and the future.

I think it’s important to understand that there are times when you may get too comfortable in a friendship where both parties don’t feel like they’re getting anything out of it anymore because I’ve seen people keep friendships going even though one person felt so uncomfortable and awkward with them all the time. There needs to be balance between how much each individual wants their own space, but at the same time making sure not to go overboard and give up on something that could have been really special had we just taken some more responsibility for our actions as well.

There is also this weird notion among Indians (at least from my experience) where no matter what happens or who breaks up with whom – feelings always seem to linger afterwards which can sometimes create a really uncomfortable situation for the person who’s left.

And then there is also that whole thing about Indian families where it can be very difficult to let go of someone you once considered your friend because we are so used to keeping everything in and not confronting things head-on which creates this space between people where no one ever talks or confronts any issues until they’re forced to do so, but by then, often times friendships have already been lost.

But what I’m talking about here specifically is when an Indian breaks up with another ethnically-Indian friend – enough said.”

“It’s hard losing friends,” she told me sadly when I asked her how she felt after our most recent breakup. There was something about her tone of voice that made me stop and think about it for a minute. Every time this happens, I find myself in the same position with my Indian friends – trying to figure out what happened while simultaneously feeling guilty for not being able to understand what’s going on in their life or why they decided to end things when we were both so happy together..I’m just left shaking my head wondering how someone who was once such an important part of your life can become nothing more than an acquaintance over night.” “It’s hard losing friends,” she told me sadly when I asked her how she felt after our most recent breakup. There was something about her tone of voice that made me stop and think about it for a minute.

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