A cyber crime occurs when someone steals personal or confidential information from a computer. The content below discusses the different types of cyber crimes and what usually happens during each type of cyber crime.

A few examples include phishing, ransomware, and spoofing.

Phishing: Someone sends an email to a person or company, usually asking for personal information or money. The message may appear as though it is from someone the recipient knows but this isn’t always true. Once they receive and open the email, malware installs on their device which steals confidential data.

Ransomware: A virus that encrypts files on your computer and demands payment in order to decrypt them again. Ransomware can infect any type of digital media including USB devices, CDs/DVDs, etc. You could be at risk even if you don’t use social media sites because many ransomware infections come through spam emails like phishing scams–malicious attachments disguised as something else such as invoices are common too!

Phishing Scams: a type of scam that tricks people into giving up personal information by pretending to be trustworthy. The message typically contains some kind of urgent call-to-action such as claiming your account has been compromised or warning you about fraudulent activity on your credit card. Phishing scams can often look legitimate because the sender knows certain details such as name, email address and sometimes even banking information!

Theft With Access To Accounts: when someone who is authorized to access an account takes money from it without authorization.

One example would be if they had power over funds in an employee’s timecard system and changed their hours for themself with no intention of reimbursing them–this could lead to everyone losing out on vacation pay.

Data Breach: when unauthorized access to confidential data is obtained.

One example would be when a company’s computer system was breached and the thieves made off with employee personal information such as Social Security numbers, names, addresses, date of birth and credit card numbers–this could lead to identity theft or fraudulent charges on those accounts.

Phishing Scam: pretending to be trustworthy in order to gain sensitive information (such as account details) from an individual by email or phone pretexting ̶ where one person assumes the identity of another for their own advantage. The message typically contains some kind of urgent call-to-action such as claiming your account has been compromised or warning you about fraudulent activity on your credit card. Phishing scams can be very convincing by using familiar logos, idents and graphics to make them seem legitimate.

A close cousin of phishing scams are spear-phishing attacks–targeted emails or phone calls that contain specific information about the recipient (such as their name, position at work) in order to bypass spam filters and security systems. The message may ask you to provide sensitive information such as passwords, click on a link containing malware etc.

There is also ransomware which typically blocks access to an individual’s computer system with malicious encryption software until they pay up for the release key

if not paid ransom will increase over time or damages could be irreversible. A recent example was when Wannacry wreaked havoc around the world encrypting files on over 230,00 computers.

Cybercrime has a human face as well–cyber-criminals may create fake profiles on social media and chat sites to befriend you with the goal of extracting personal information from you like your address or bank account number. Once they get what they need, it’s too late–the damage has been done and there is no turning back. They might also take over your email inbox by spoofing addresses so that when an important message comes in, it gets sent to their own private mailbox instead of yours making it difficult for you to know which messages are actually legitimate emails from people who care about you versus one more attempt at hacking into your life.

The cyber criminal world is constantly evolving but our precautions should not be. There are many ways we can stay safe online, such as installing antivirus programs on your computer and updating them regularly so that they include the latest updates for both operating systems and security threats. You should also use a firewall to block unwanted connections from being able to enter into your system while you browse the web or send emails out of it.

We may never know who is behind these cyber crimes, but when someone takes over our life by stealing our personal information or tries to break in–we need to fight back!

Additional Content:

  • A) Do you think there could ever be an end-to-end encryption solution? Explain briefly why or why not with evidence supporting your answer.”
  • B answer.”
  • C) What are some of the things that we can do to stay safe online?”
  • D) How would a hacker break into my computer and what could they steal from me?”

A given attack may be targeted at one person, as in an extortion scheme. However, most attacks target many people simultaneously; this means spam email messages and viruses spread by worms or Trojan horse programs. The damage done ranges from minor annoyance (e-mail “bombs”) to major catastrophes such as identity theft, credit card frauds, etc. Attacks on businesses undermine their operations and threaten their survival.

A given attack may be targeted at one person, as in an extortion scheme. However, most attacks target many people simultaneously; this means spam email messages and viruses spread by worms or Trojan horse programs. The damage done ranges from minor annoyance (e-mail “bombs”) to major catastrophes such as identity theft, credit card frauds, etc. Attacks on businesses undermine their operations and threaten their survival.”

E) What are some of the ways you can protect yourself?

In addition to using anti-virus software regularly on your computer system, there are several things that you can do personally: don’t open attachments unless they come directly from someone who you know; use strong passwords for online

The answer to this question is an extensive list of threats. Cyber criminals can steal a person’s identity and commit fraud, distribute malware that steals information or infect computers with viruses that spread like wildfire across networks, install ransomware so they cannot use their own devices again unless they pay the criminal a fee, etc. These are just some examples from the top of my head!

Andy aka The Security Guy

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