In this poem, the speaker is vividly describing his feelings about a woman he loves.

The tone of the poem is remorseful and self-pitying as Prufrock can’t seem to muster up any courage to make a move on her. There are various literary techniques used in the work including dramatic irony; it’s clear that we’re meant to look down upon him for being weak or indecisive.

The speaker expresses his feelings about the woman he loves and how is indecisive. The tone of this poem is remorseful and self-pitying as Prufrock can’t seem to muster up any courage to make a move on her. There are various literary techniques used in the work including dramatic irony; it’s clear that we’re meant to look down upon him for being weak or indecisive.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock: A Guide  – When A Man Loves a Woman Chords by Ingrid Michaelson Music Video Version (Audio) YouTube

…When I am crushed with sorrow, she will be my only joy” __ “I know not what course others may take, but as for me”

…I shall be telling this with a sigh_ In years to come.

…She will not talk loud or wear bright colors__ I love her so much that  I may never risk it.” “But if she is free and loves me too, then the world has nothing more to offer than my own arms.”

“I do not know what I want with her. But (whatever it is)  she will have to give.” “And if the evenings are too cold and raw, then we’ll go indoors__ where fires burn or read together by lamplight.” “When a man loves a woman, can’t keep his mind on nothing else,” he sings. ……But when things break down for him in some way, he can’ t get off of that thing alone– He’s downed but still clinging to the rock!”

There are various literary techniques used in this poem including dramatic irony; it’s clear that we’re meant to look down upon him for being weak or powerless. He’s also very hesitant to make a decision, and this is another literary technique present in the poem. Lastly, I think that many of his thoughts are internal monologues- he’s not actually doing anything but thinking about what will happen if he does something or doesn’t do something.

So much that  I may never risk it.” “But if she is free and loves me too, then the world has nothing more to offer than my own arms.”

“I do not know what I want with her. But (whatever it is) Â she will have to give.” “And if the evenings are too cold and raw, then we’ll go indoors__ where fires burn or read together by lamplight._ Unless, of course, she prefers to go home.”

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock: A Guide is a poem by T. S. Eliot that tells the story from the point-of-view of one man as he spends an evening at his old college with “a pair or peers” who know him intimately but are still strangers to him in some ways. The speaker seems unable or unwilling to take any decisive action and we’re not sure what it is he wants (except for her) until near the end when he can’t deny himself anymore and admits that  “whatever [it]  may be”. By then though there’s no time left because they’ll have already gone their separate ways back to their different houses, the ones they married into.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock: A Guide is Eliot’s early masterpiece and his first truly modernist poem in that it presents a fragmented world with no clear rhyme or meter to help find any meaning for life. It also contains some of his most famous lines including “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons” which has led to him being called one of the greatest poets who ever lived by many people. This can be seen in how this work put him on an equal footing as other great writers  like Shakespeare despite not having written anything else until years later when he wrote another long-form piece titled The Waste Land which was published after World War I.

A brief guide, then, to The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock:

Eliot was a poet and critic who wrote this poem in 1910 while he was working as an editor for the literary magazine “The Harvard Advocate” Â after his boss asked him to write something new, more modern than what he had been writing up until that point (which is why Eliot called it “one of my most trivial productions”). He said it took him about ten minutes to complete. Even though the work came much later in life when Eliot became famous for other works including The Waste Land which many critics feel has eclipsed this one, some still say they like reading it more because its lines are less complicated and confusing.

He used fragments throughout the poem so it can be read in many different ways. Â Eliot wrote the poem with a fragmented style that helped him to represent the feelings of anxiety and fragmentation he felt at the time, which is why some say this work really represents modernism more than any other poem does.

Eliot grapples with issues like isolation, meaninglessness of life, fear of death and God’s indifference towards man as well as his own loneliness. Â The speaker struggles to find happiness or meaning in life while questioning whether anything matters anymore due to eventual mortality. This struggle for understanding what has value stems from boredom because he says “I have measured out my life.” He also questions if there are religious truths or even just morals left when one considers life’s chaos, saying “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.”

Trying to find some sort of meaning in his own actions or even the world around him, Prufrock says:

 “In a minute there is time/For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse,” but he concludes that ultimately it doesn’t matter. The speaker does not believe in God because he sees no evidence for one–“the heaven over our heads is blue and full of stars”  He also states that death comes too soon as well (in an age when most people died sooner), so all pleasures are fleeting if they’re enjoyed at all. This leads to feelings of isolation where nothing matters anymore due to eventual mortality. -In the second stanza, Prufrock tells himself that he is not too old to act on his desires and should “let be” all thoughts of time’s passage. However, once again he remembers how quickly death approaches and concludes it doesn’t matter if we make any attempt at living life fully because in an hour or a day our world could change so drastically (perhaps with the death of one).  So ultimately everyone dies alone–we are just like ships passing in the night as far as other people are concerned. He says: “I have seen them looking seaward, when I think they were watching me,” which means others might exist but only for themselves. It also means that while you’re alive you can

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