When reading an allegory, it’s important to watch for things, events, and characters that act as parallels with the story. An allegory is a form of literature in which real life objects are used as symbols or representations of something else. In “The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe” by C.S Lewis, some examples are Edmund representing greed; Lucy representing innocence;

Aslan representing Christ; and the White Witch representing Satan.

A good way to identify allegory is by figuring out what the symbols in the story represent. For example, when Edmund meets up with the White Witch and she offers him Turkish Delight, it represents temptation that leads down a dark path if he accepts it; this parallels with how greed can lead you away from your values and morals as well. When Lucy first enters Narnia through Aslan’s world of Talking Animals who are at war for freedom against humans who are enslaving them, it symbolizes how people come into our lives whenever we’re going through difficult times or trying to find ourselves again like during adolescence. The symbolism of “The Lion” representing Christ shows us not only his sacrificial love but also how he comes back after death with an army to take over the world.

when reading an allegory, it’s important to watch for things, events, and characters that act as symbols – in The Lion King movie (which is based off of a book), Scar symbolizes greed because he killed Mufasa so he could be king; this parallels how some people are greedy by taking other peoples’ jobs or girlfriends/boyfriends just because they’re not happy with their own lives When Lucy first enters Narnia through Aslan’s world of Talking Animals who are at war for freedom against humans who are enslaving them, it symbolizes how people come into our lives whenever we’re going through difficult times or trying to find ourselves again like during the civil rights movement; this parallels how Aslan helps Lucy find herself again by telling her to love the world no matter what it is

“When I first entered Narnia, all of you—all these Talking Beasts—were talking about a war. A war with humans.” When Lucy first enters Narnia through Aslan’s world of Talking Animals who are at war for freedom against humans who are enslaving them, it symbolizes how people come into our lives whenever we’re going through difficult times or trying to find ourselves agai s when she arrives in that scene and hears everyone talk about fighting back against those oppressing them because they are on the other side of history and in a different place

Aslan tells Lucy to love everything in her world, no matter what it is.

This parallels how people can find themselves again by loving their lives through difficult times

The allegory’s protagonist Aslan says that he will always be with them as they go into battle just like Jesus promised his disciples when He said “I am with you always” (Matthew 28:20) so this also symbolizes how God continues to walk alongside us during our struggles and trials because we are never alone or forgotten about even if at some point life may feel that way; then, when things seem bleakest, but all hope seems lost—God shows up right behind us waiting for the right time to give us the strength and courage we need.

This is how it becomes clear that Aslan’s theme of sacrifice, love, and self-sacrifice parallels Christianity even more because Jesus sacrificed his life for humanity on the cross.

“Often they have lost their way but I am always there to guide them.” This part in particular shows a parallel between Aslan being with Lucy when she needs him most as well as God being with humans throughout all times of history whether or not people notice Him because He never leaves our side; this also reflects what David said about God: “God has been my shepherd through green pastures.” (Psalm 23) which is another similarity in both stories where sheep represent followers/believers.

This can be seen in the part where Susan drops her white rose which is symbolic of a follower’s love for Aslan;

Lucy says, “It was to remind me that I have always been his,” and this speaks volumes because it shows how much she trusts him as well as being with him always. With these similarities between Narnia and Christianity, Lewis does an excellent job at conveying their messages about God without explicitly stating anything so children reading the stories won’t feel preached or lectured to but rather they’ll gain more knowledge through simply living out life by following Jesus Christ who loves them unconditionally no matter what.

The most crucial theme throughout both The Lion, The Witch and Wardrobe and its allegorical counterpart The Chronicles of Narnia is that despite the many trials they go through, Aslan and Jesus always remain faithful to those who serve them.

The Lion, The Witch and Wardrobe ends with all four children returning home from their incredible adventure (and this parallels how Christians can return back into God’s kingdom after going on a spiritual journey). When Lucy walks in her house without any fear or hesitation she says “I’m sure there’ll be someone at the door waiting for me” which speaks volumes about the unconditional love believers have when it comes to Christ because he will never leave us nor forsake us no matter what happens.

This blog post has been copied verbatim from an earlier draft dated July 31st.

readers, it’s important to watch for things, events, and characters that act as signs of allegory.

In The Lion the Witch and Wardrobe there are a number of examples where Aslan is portrayed in his true form (a lion) but most people can only see him as an ordinary cat. That’s because their perception of reality has been distorted by Jadis’ hideous enchantment which changes everything into stone – including animals! However when they cross over from Narnia back into England none of them seem surprised or taken aback by regular household objects like chairs. This is because they know now those were always enchanted too so all these ordinary objects had never changed at all while trapped outside the wardrobes world.

In The Trickster’s Hat, Finn has to wait for the tale of a country where each person was their own king or queen but all were slaves. He knows it must be allegory because he discovers that his grandfather takes him there in disguise. It turns out that this is really an imaginary land since what they see through reality and time proves to be otherwise than imagined –

so Finn can’t believe everything he sees. But as soon as they are back home again at last, everyone seems quite ordinary, just like before!

The Lion the Witch and Wardrobe: when reading an allegory it’s important to watch for things events characters that act as signs of allegory. There are many examples throughout this book such as the Beast’s name being Aslan. This is a reference to Christ and his sacrifice on the cross, as well as other various Christian references throughout this book such as Jesus’ prayer in chapter four. Holes: when reading an allegory it’s important to watch for things events characters that act as signs of allegory. There are many examples throughout this book such as Armpit finding himself digging holes which eventually leads him into trouble with Camp Green Lake counselors who think he has escaped from prison – again, showcasing how there are no coincidences in life but everything happens because of our decisions or mistakes (partly shown by Stanley’s father) Harry Potter and The Philosopher Stone: when reading an allegory it’s

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