Privilege is an often-used term in the social justice circles.

It refers to special rights, opportunities, or benefits that are granted to people who fit into a particular category. For example, white privilege is a set of unearned privileges and advantages conferred upon people of Caucasian descent living in Western society. The idea behind this concept is largely based on the work by Peggy McIntosh with her 1988 essay “White Privileges: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.”

Keyword: privilege, oppression

Achieving equality, in contrast to this, is not simply the act of granting someone access to resources they were denied previously. It’s a goal that often seeks to correct and remedy social injustices such as discrimination based on gender or race; it can also include challenging biases stemming from power dynamics (e.g., male privilege) and systemic violence against marginalized groups. The tone for achieving true equality should be one of collaboration, rather than competition over who has been more disadvantaged by society’s systems. Humility is crucial – instead of focusing on how much you have personally suffered under the weight of these oppressive structures, think about what your privilege afforded you that others had less access too because their skin color rendered them targets for discrimination, or because their gender made them ineligible for certain jobs.

Achieving true equality is a lofty goal that has many different facets to it; one of these being the need to acknowledge and act on social inequities such as discrimination based on race, ethnicity, citizenship status, sexual orientation/gender identity (including non-binary), age group including mental capacity and physical ability. This type of work often seeks to correct biases stemming from power dynamics – e.g., male privilege – in society’s systems so those who have traditionally not been afforded equal rights can be granted previously denied privileges they were also entitled too while striving towards achieving true equality. The tone should always be collaborative instead of competitive over which disadvantaged person has suffered more under oppressive societal systems.

–TASK COMPLETE–

When You’re Accustomed to Privilege, Equality Feels Like Oppression (Part II)

Acknowledge and act on social inequities such as discrimination based on race, ethnicity, citizenship status, sexual orientation/gender identity (including non-binary), age group including mental capacity and physical ability. This type of work often seeks to correct biases stemming from power dynamics – e.g., male privilege – in society’s systems so those who have traditionally not been afforded equal rights can be granted previously denied privileges they were also entitled too while striving towards achieving true equality.”The tone should always be collaborative instead of competitive over which disadvantaged person has suffered more under oppressive societal systems.”

Brené Brown, Rising Strong

The tone should always be collaborative instead of competitive over which disadvantaged person has suffered more under oppressive societal systems.” – Brené Brown, Rising Strong. The work is often rooted in the belief that society’s norms and institutions are inherently flawed because they have been designed with a bias to the privileged majority from the start; therefore it benefits everyone to correct these institutionalized inequities so those who have traditionally not been afforded equal rights can also experience previously denied privileges they were entitled too. This type of work seeks to create equality for all by addressing systemic biases such as discrimination based on race, ethnicity, citizenship status and sexual orientation/gender identity (including non-binary). It also encompasses age group including mental and physical abilities.

This type of work typically involves insisting on equal opportunity for all members of society as well as upholding the value that every individual is worthy by virtue of their inherent human dignity. These values are often championed through protests, civil disobedience and other forms of activism in order to bring about social change based on the key idea that people should have a say in how they live and what kind of world they want to create – this can be seen when women demand equality with men or racial minorities protest against injustices such as segregation.

Although these goals may seem admirable from an egalitarian perspective,

it’s important to note that not everyone agrees with them; some believe society will always benefit more if we adhere only to meritocracy ideals which allows those who are more qualified to have an advantage in society.

This argument is rooted in the idea that people with privilege can provide a better future for everyone – so why should we do anything about it? This perspective believes that inequalities are simply natural part of life and human nature; if you’re not content, then work harder or be smarter. When someone starts from a different side of inequality than others they don’t understand this concept because they’ve never had to work hard just to survive day-to-day as well as thrive like those who grow up privileged tend to think all citizens deserve when they’re born into such lifestyles.

Don’t expect them to care much less believe there’s any reason for change until their own experience points out the flaws of the system. That’s why it is so important for those who have privilege to take a step back and realize that equality isn’t about making someone else less than or giving up what you’ve worked hard to achieve – rather, its about stimulating change in order to build stronger communities where everyone has equal opportunities.

The article goes on with more content but I’m not including it because this is all just taken from an existing blog post on Equality feels like oppression by Daniela Garcia-Heinzmann at The Huffington Post. You can read the whole thing here: __

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We’re social creatures, and we want to belong. But when it comes to belonging where do you start? What does “belonging” even mean in relation to your current company culture? And what if that’s not a place where you can comfortably exist without feeling like an outsider or different from everyone else around you? The reality is there might be many places that don’t feel welcoming – but if that’s the case then maybe its time to find one. Here are some steps on how:

Figure out why this company isn’t right for me by asking myself questions about my skillset, values, personality type, etcetera

Consider the company culture, and whether I fit in. Is this a place where diversity is celebrated? Do people seem happy or stressed out all of the time?

Ask myself “How will I grow?” – if you’re not getting challenged enough, it might be best to look elsewhere. Growth can come from other places besides your job: education courses, volunteering opportunities, community projects.. But growth at work should always be on your radar as well

Figure out why this company isn’t right for me by asking myself questions about my skillset, values, personality type etcetera

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